Zoë Morley is a very talented photographer who uses her creativity for worthy causes. I wanted to get her on the show to talk about the challenges that she’s faced in fundraising her charity projects and how she overcame them.

This topic has been on my mind recently, especially with the bushfires in Australia; a community has come together and brought their skill sets to help people who are less fortunate than them and if you’re just seeing the finished product on social media, the process can seem easy. But so much hard work goes into these projects and I think it’s important to look behind the curtain to see exactly what it takes to run a successful campaign.

Starting Out

Zoë is a Sydney-based photographer who has been shooting weddings for seven years. She made her break in a pretty funny way. She worked as a flight attendant but had a background in photography and so to shortcut all of the grunt work of being a second shooter, etc. before she could start booking weddings on her own, Zoë put on a big fake wedding with her cousin (who’s a model), got a wedding dress from Grace Loves Lace, invited all of her friends and used the photos for her portfolio, which helped her book her first year of weddings. The really funny part is, she’d never even been to a wedding before (just like me…).

 

Focus on your business, not social media

Zoë used the portfolio to get 20 bookings in her first year but it wasn’t through social media – she used Google AdWords. Not many photographers know how to use this, so understanding power of Google Ads can be a gamechanger. This is something I teach my workshop students – everyone else will be competing on Instagram but if you know how to use AdWords, you can fill up your year pretty easily.

Zoë also focuses way more on running her business than racking up Instagram likes. She’s more interested in caring for her clients, packaging, getting her name out there and optimising referrals, keywords and online bookings from Google.

Zoë Morley

Nonjabulo

Zoë was born in South Africa and always wanted to give back to that community. When she was 19, she spent three months volunteering at an orphanage called Nonjabolu that cares for the children who have been abandoned because of HIV/AIDs. She had her first film camera with her and took photos of the kids; when she got back home, she raised support to put on an exhibition to raise funds for the orphanage. She managed to get a big review on the front page of the Arts section of the Sydney Morning Herald which boosted awareness and she ended up raising $20K for the orphanage.

Ten years later, she thought ‘wouldn’t it be cool to revisit that project’? She wanted to photograph the kids who were now teens and young adults and see how their lives had progressed.

Zoe Morley

The Challenges

Zoë ran a Kickstarter campaign and only expected to cover flights and accommodation but ended up raising $11K, which paid for travel and putting on the exhibition. But there were so many unforeseeable challenges in actually getting back out to South Africa and finding these kids, all of which she goes into on the podcast. She’s really open and honest in our conversation and she talks about how she suffers from anxiety and self-doubt. It didn’t matter how many people were telling her that her work was great, she still lacked confidence and doubted the quality of the images that she took.

Even though her photos were accepted in the Head On Photo Festival – a life dream of hers – as you’ll hear on the podcast, the pressure that she put on herself took a big toll on her mental health. She lost half a year’s worth of income, as she didn’t shoot weddings and outsource her editing and got so stressed that it affected both her mental and her physical wellbeing.

 

The Big Night

South African-born Australian businesswoman Gail Kelly opened the show and although Zoë had expected a maximum of 100 guests, on the night over 200 people showed up. Everyone was really supportive, she sold lots of books and prints and ended up raising $32K.

This money was used to change people’s lives. She split the money between the orphanage Rehoboth, an AIDS hospice and a crèche, all of which are in desperate need of funding.

Zoë Morley

What did she learn?

Even though the night was a big success, Zoë found it hard to acknowledge this and still doubted her work. It shows that creatives are often self-critical and can we can be our own worst enmeies.

I asked Zoë what she would do differently and she had three pieces of advice for anyone planning to run a  fundraiser:

  • Research – Know who you’re going to work with and check if they are happy to work with you – a good relationship with a charity will make the world of difference.

 

  • Get help when you need it – If you’re running a fundraising exhibition then ask for help and work with a group who you can delegate jobs to – basically, don’t do everything yourself.

 

  • Make sure you have a reason ‘why’ you’re doing this – Choose a charity that you’re really passionate about -in the hard times, having a ‘why’ will get you through.

I was really honoured that Zoë shared her story with me and gave us all an insight into the hard work that goes into a project like this. You can check out the photos at Nonjabolu and follow her on Instagram.

 

And I just wanted to say a big thank you to everyone who has left reviews on this podcast – it’s so amazing to read your feedback and hear what you’re getting value from these episodes. Please be sure to tag me at JaiLong.co if you share the podcast on Insta and I can join in the conversation.

 

One more thing – my Posing & Lighting course is out now and it’s the biggest project I’ve ever worked on! I’m so excited to share it with you guys and I can’t wait to hear your feedback.

Cheers guys, see you next episode 🙂

 

 

Workshops

I’ve got live workshops coming up in New York, Los Angeles, Melbourne, and Sydney – there are still tickets left and I’d love to meet you in person and help take your business to the next level.

BOOK YOUR SEAT NOW!

 

Episode Sponsor

This episode is brought to you by the guys over at PepperStorm, an awesome copywriting team who I have used across all my businesses for years. If you need some killer copywriting, get in touch and use the code: MAKEYOURBREAK to get $100USD off when you buy one of their packages.

CHECK OUT PEPPERSTORM’S COPYWRITING & SEO SERVICES

I’m going to continue the second part of this two-parter by talking about why it’s important to write your own story. I’ve already told you about my childhood story and now I’m going to tell you about my business story and how I’m still learning from everything I’ve been through to write my own story every day.

It’s easy to see people who have success and assume that they’ve had it come easy. It’s also easy to create excuses for ourselves and assume that  someone is succeeding because they have money, or an education, or don’t have kids… But comparing yourself to others is toxic because you simply don’t know what they’ve been through. Instead, use this good energy to focus on building your own business.

 

Write your own story

Last time I told you about how my cafe business had failed and I was totally out of cash. I didn’t want my failed business to not become part of my identity. At the time we were going through a minerals boom in Australia, so I jumped on an opportunity and moved up to the mines in Queensland.

It felt like a prison and my bedroom was like a jail cell. The gym had barbed wire around it and the weights were old and rusty. I spent 12 months there working as an electrician before moving to the mines near Perth, which was the most challenging job I’ve ever had. I was attacked physically and mentally. I met someone who had no good in their heart. There was even a murder.

My workmates spent all afternoon in the pub and I didn’t really want to spend my time drinking. I thought that as I’m in such a beautiful part of the country, I wanted to learn photography.

I jumped on eBay and bought a Canon 5D with a fish-eye lens. My flatmate also bought a camera and we’d drive down to the ocean and take photos of the sunset and beautiful landscape.

I put together a blog called Free The Bird and posted my images on there and wrote a few captions about what I liked about the photos. The blog was perfect because I also want to practice writing and being able to tell a story. Just those few captions on each photo were game-changing. Through the blog and Instagram, I could share my art with people who knew me.

I came back home and it was like returning from prison. I had to reintegrate myself into society. I got myself a normal job as an electrician, worked up the ladder and was given my own job site. The only catch was that Leelou and I had to move to Melbourne but this opportunity was worth it. I could be my only boss, run a team and have my own life at the same time. I really felt like I’d made it and was proud of the work that I was doing. But I knew it wasn’t going to last forever, so I needed to take advantage of the situation to build for my future

 

Learn about money

I needed to learn about money and understand why do some people struggle others have so much. I contacted a financial planner and studied the mindset of wealthy people. I grew up around people with a scarcity mindset and now I was surrounded by people with an abundance mindset. This was another life lesson to add to confidence is keythere is abundance.

I wanted to put what I’d learned into practice, so I took my $100K savings to the bank who then loaned me a million dollars. Just stop for a second and think of how weird it was for someone with my upbringing looking at their bank account and seeing a million bucks. I used the money to buy two houses in Melbourne and I still have them today.

 

Don’t sell your time

Anyone who knows me will know that I don’t want to swap my time for money. I’m always looking for ways to build wealth without having to spend a lot of time doing it. So now I had some houses, I figured I didn’t need my job and decided to become a full-time photographer. I liked taking pictures of people and I wanted creative control, so I reckoned wedding photography was right for me. The weirdest and funniest thing about this is that up until that point I’d never even been to a wedding, other than my parents’ which was held in the front room of my house.

I set myself goals for the next year:

  • Be a professional wedding photographer
  • Shoot 30 weddings
  • Teach a creative business workshop
  • Learn how to shoot in manual mode

 

This was ambitious even for me, so I hustled as I’ve never hustled before. I knew I had to go to the US as wedding season was over in Australia, so I put the word out on blogs and social media that I would shoot for free in return for a couch to sleep on and within a month I booked 8 weddings. Now I just needed to get myself there, so I sold my car to pay for me and Leeloou to head to America.

The weddings were fantastic but I knew I needed more content for my site, so in between weddings we would raid thrift stores for wedding dresses and I’d do a photoshoot with  Leelou in awesome locations like Joshua Tree.

We had a lot of adventures and we were so low on money but I saw it as an investment in our future. Another life lesson that I learned was that you don’t get opportunities like this by playing it safe.

When I got back I was published in Junebug Weddings and Hello May magazine, so I was now an international wedding photographer and published photographer. Oh yeah, and I can now shoot in manual mode all day long…

Launching my first workshop

Just 18 months after I started my business, I launched my first workshop. I taught the business and my friend Ryan Muirhead flew over to teach photography. It took a huge amount and of time and energy and in the end, I think I was about $5K out of pocket. Some people might see this as a failure but I saw it as an investment, as the ticket for my education. And it worked.

It skyrocketed my career. I was asked to talk at the biggest conferences, be a guest speaker at other workshops and it really put my business on the map.

In two years I had shot 60 weddings in 4 different countries, held a workshop, was named one of the 30 rising stars of wedding photography by New York Magazine Rangefinder, was Caption magazine’s runner-up photographer of the year and was published in all my favourite wedding magazines.

It might sound like I’m bragging, but I’m telling you this to inspire any creative entrepreneurs and show you that making it is possible.

And believe me, I got hate mail.

People thought it was coming so easily to me. My peers blamed me for their lack of success and one US professor of photography even sent me a 10-page email critiquing my pictures. He was actually 100% right and I learned so much from him – I’m sure that’s not the result he wanted but it proved to me that if you have confidence in yourself then no one can shake you.

People will get upset if you fail or succeed. Just do it for you and you will be an unstoppable force

And it’s not all easy. I’m still fighting every day to continue this life I’ve built. Leelou and I currently live in a tiny house with no TV. I make good money but I invest it back into my projects, just like this podcast. I get up on stage at workshops and I’m still really scared but I know I have to be out of my comfort zone in order to keep growing.

 

My new story

I want to finish up by talking about my new business, jailong.co, which is focused on teaching business to creative entrepreneurs. It blows my mind that I can just think of a fun project and make it happen and that even thoughI’ve grown up, I still get to be a kid and play on the projects that I want to do. I make decisions not out of fear, but from knowing that I have the power to change my life, to do more, be more and love more.

Here’s what I’ve learned:

  • Self-confidence will get you everything.
  • Be resilient and don’t let failure stop you from living your best life.
  • Don’t let people who don’t have your best interest at heart give you advice or jade your perspective.
  • Trust in yourself.

 

Thanks for taking the time to listen to my stories – if it can help just one person then I know I’ll have succeeded.

Find me on Insta, and if you want to share this podcast then be sure to tag me in.

Cheers guys, catch you next time!

I know that ‘money’ can sometimes seem like a dirty word. It’s a topic that some people hate talking about – but it’s so important! That’s why I’m hoping I can offer some good takeaways that make it a little easier for you to understand. Unfortunately, we simply don’t get taught about money unless we take it upon ourselves to get educated. We spend so much time trying to optimise our lives (how we can be the most productive, get more Instagram followers, etc.), so why shouldn’t we optimise our relationship with money as well? I wanted this episode to help you do just that, so you can actually have your money work for you.

Jai Long

HOW I LEARNED ABOUT MONEY

Everyone learns about financial issues in a different way. For me, I’ve had to sort of learn through experience. I grew up in a very low-income household in a poor socioeconomic neighbourhood. I know what it’s like to not have money, which has allowed me to have the mindset that I only have something to gain and nothing to lose. Growing up in poverty has also let me use my creative superpowers to brainstorm more unconventional ways to make money. When I was about 25, I was making a lot of money but I couldn’t figure out why I couldn’t afford certain things. So, I decided to read every book about money that I could find and hired a financial adviser and an accountant. Bottom line: I learned how to use this advice along with basic common sense to build wealth.

 

WHY WE SHOULD EDUCATE OURSELVES ABOUT WEALTH

My favourite phrase is, “Build wealth for your future self.” This means that all of the choices you make today can affect your future self, which means that the time to take control of your finances is right now. The present is also a good time to get started because we’re currently experiencing the biggest transfer of wealth in history (more billionaires than ever, boomers are giving way to millennials, wealth is being unlocked). Education can help you tap into that transfer and allow you to create wealth for yourself and for future generations to come.

Jai Long

WHAT’S HOLDING YOU BACK FROM MAKING MORE MONEY?

You might have some money hang-ups that are holding you back from building your wealth. You might be self-sabotaging by thinking there’s some sort of honour in poverty or by having the mindset that money changes you in some way. That means you’re operating in a scarcity mindset, often ruled by resentment or fear. However, I’m a firm believer that you are actually selfish if you’re not trying to make money. The single biggest impact you can make on the world is to make money – to create jobs and opportunities for the people that work for you and for your family. Making money means you also have the power to make decisions on where your money goes (such as into ethical business decisions that might improve society or the planet). Once you have enough to spare, you can put your money into things that you truly believe in. 

 

SWITCHING TO AN ABUNDANCE MINDSET

By focusing on what you have and what you want, you can create an abundance mindset (instead of a scarcity mindset). This means you believe there’s enough money to go around, which then leads to the power of attraction. You can ask the universe for what you want because it’s what you know you deserve. If you look around, every single thing you look at is a reflection of someone making money or generating income. This unlocks the idea that there’s always money to be made and opportunities out there for you to take advantage of – the possibilities of which are endless. 

 

HOW TO PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK

Once you’re in an abundance mindset, you can put your money to work. I put away 40% of everything I earn, I have no credit cards, and I have no backup plan. That means I have to constantly put my money to work. If I invest my money in a low-interest savings account, I’ll barely get any return on my money over time (especially accounting for inflation). However, if I invest in the stock market, I can take advantage of the power of compounding. Keep in mind: investing is all about having foresight; you can’t stress yourself about short-term gains. Look at the broader picture to see what will have value in the future. On the same note, evaluate opportunity costs and what return you’ll get. For example, when I started out as a wedding photographer, I was shooting with lenses that didn’t really work because I couldn’t afford the equipment. Instead of spending $500 on new lenses, I signed up for a workshop that cost me $2,000. While I spent more money initially, this workshop ended up making me tens of thousands of dollars over the next few years, so the opportunity cost was well worth it.

 

KNOW YOUR WORTH

One key point I’d like to make is that you should always tip your scales so that your income is heavier than your expenses. People have a tendency to keep spending money as they’re earning it. We grow with how much money we make. However, this can become toxic. I recommend putting your profits first, then focusing on sales, and then expenses. Be sure that you’re making sales and you’re making enough money to pay off or lower your expenses. Within the sales arena, don’t sell yourself short. Always price your services according to what people are actually prepared to pay. By offering unnecessary discounts, you could end up creating a less than perfect experience for your client and getting underpaid in the process. I’d also like to note that knowing your worth doesn’t mean that you should feel bad about taking on other jobs or projects. There’s no shame in getting a second job, a side hustle, upselling your services or taking on more revenue streams. All of this generated income can go into growing your business and building your wealth.

 

Making direct changes with my money means that I’m generating an income that serves my clients and myself. I’m using my money to create opportunities and build a better world. If you have questions or thoughts about this topic, DM me for a chat on @jailong.co. Hopefully, this has made money a little more approachable for you!


Jai’s 5 favourite books on finances. Click to download


Workshops

I’ve got live workshops coming up in New York, Los Angeles, Melbourne, and Sydney – there are still tickets left and I’d love to meet you in person and help take your business to the next level.

BOOK YOUR SEAT NOW!

 

Episode Sponsor

This episode is brought to you by the guys over at PepperStorm, an awesome copywriting team who I have used across all my businesses for years. If you need some killer copywriting, get in touch and use the code: MAKEYOURBREAK to get $100USD off when you buy one of their packages.

CHECK OUT PEPPERSTORM’S COPYWRITING & SEO SERVICES

 

Follow me on Instagram @jailong.co

In this episode of ‘Make Your Break’, Jarrad Seng shares with us how his career got started and some of his career highlights. Then myself & Jarrad dive into a quick mastermind to talk about ways you can either identify an opportunity or create an opportunity from a situation. I think it is inspiring to hear from people like Jarrad, just how he has created his career into what it is today.

 

Jarrad Seng Podcast

My highlight from this conversation is when Jarrad is telling us about a story from a few months ago, drinking with Ed Sheeren for his birthday at Pizza Hut and buying a house on a whim over the internet in the early hours of the morning. It sounds like such a typical rockstar story!
Here are the 5 different stories Jarred and I cover in regards to creating or identifying an opportunity:

 

  • “Fake it till you make it”. A story from Jarred about how Adobe contacted him to be a Lightroom expert and how he navigated around the opportunity
  •  “Opening a door”. I talk about how I sold my car to invest in my business and used the money to create a portfolio of work
  • “Get yourself in the room”. Jarred tells us about how he got on to the TV show, Survivor.
  • “Turning a disaster into an opportunity” Jarred smashed his friend’s camera and got a job working with Canon as a result.
  • “Doing what you love, no matter the cost”. We both talk about shooting for free and not letting rules stop us from achieving what we want.

 

 

My online course ‘Album Academy’ is about to drop. So if you would love to start designing and selling albums, this course is going to be a game-changer. To get started, you can download the free tip guide and join the waiting list.

If you would like to internet creep Jarrad, check out his Instagram here. I also suggest googling his name and watching some of the funny things he has been up to over the last few years.